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Library Events & Outreach, 2020-2021

Real News vs. Fake News

Skyline College Library invites students to join us Tuesday, March 23 for a program to explore Real News vs. Fake News. Please stay tuned for additional details! 

Fake News

Reporters with various forms of "fake news" from a

Fake news is not a new phenomenon, but the 2016 elections have brought it to the forefront of our attention. The term "fake news," has become a catch-all for all different kinds of news that promote false information, intentionally mislead readers, manipulate our emotions, and provide affirmation to our existing viewpoints and biases.

To complicate things further, it's also becoming more and more common for many people to label news that disagrees with their own viewpoints as fake, without further investigating or verifying the information being presented. So, sometimes you might hear that a news article is fake or that a news source is fake, even when it's pretty reliable. When in doubt, it''s always good to check for yourself.

“Fake news” is not news you disagree with. "Fake news” are news stories that have no factual basis but are presented as facts. The ability to tell accurate news from fake news is an important skill that you'll use your entire life.  This guide will give you valuable insight in telling fact from fiction online, plus a chance to exercise your newfound skills.